Prof. Greg Deierlein, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Gregory G. Deierlein

Director

Biography

Gregory G. Deierlein is the John A. Blume Professor of Engineering at Stanford University where he directs the Blume Earthquake Engineering Center. He earned his B.S. from Cornell University, M.S. from the University of California at Berkeley, and PhD. from the University of Texas at Austin. Between his M.S. and Ph.D., Greg worked with Leslie E. Robertson and Associates in New York, where he was involved in the structural design of the 72-story Bank of China Building in Hong Kong and other landmark buildings. He maintains professional involvement as a consultant and peer reviewer on projects involving performance-based seismic design and nonlinear analysis and assessment.

Greg is the John A. Blume Professor of Engineering at Stanford University where he directs the Blume Earthquake Engineering Center. He earned his B.S. from Cornell University, M.S. from the University of California at Berkeley, and PhD. from the University of Texas at Austin. Between his M.S. and Ph.D., Greg worked with Leslie E. Robertson and Associates in New York, where he was involved in the structural design of the 72-story Bank of China Building in Hong Kong and other landmark buildings. He maintains professional involvement as a consultant and peer reviewer on projects involving performance-based seismic design and nonlinear analysis and assessment.

Greg is active in technical and building code standards committees, including the Applied Technology Council, the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC), the Structural Engineer’s Association of California, the Building Seismic Safety Council, the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), and other organizations. Greg and his students have collaborated with Geohazards International on outreach projects in earthquake risk mitigation in Indonesia, Pakistan, India and Peru. From 2000 to 2007, Greg served as the Deputy Director for the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research (PEER) Center where he helped lead development of the PEER framework methodology and enabling technologies for performance-based earthquake engineering.

Greg’s research involves design and behavior of structures with emphasis on nonlinear analysis, performance-based earthquake and fire engineering, fracture mechanics and stability, and development of seismically resilient building systems. He has led international collaborative research teams to develop, test and prepare design guidelines for innovative composite steel-concrete frame systems, self-centering braced frame systems, and seismically-isolated unibody light-frame systems. Over his twenty-five year academic career, he has advised/co-advised thirty PhD students.

The research and professional accomplishments of Greg and his students and other collaborators, have been recognized through several awards including ASCE’s Norman Medals, Walter L. Huber Research Prize, State-of-the-Art Awards, and Raymond Reese Research Prize, the AISC Special Recognition Award, EERI Spectra Best Paper Awards, an Engineering New Record 25 Top Newsmakers Award, and a Popular Mechanics Top 10 Breakthrough Award. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2013.

Vision

My various involvements in EERI for over twenty-five years have been enjoyable and educational. Participation in EERI’s meetings and seminars has been intellectually rewarding, where I have especially appreciated participating in the EERI’s seminar series on Evaluation of Existing Reinforced Concrete Buildings and Performance-Based Design of Tall Buildings and presenting keynote lectures at the EERI 50th Anniversary Meeting and the 1906 Earthquake Centennial Conference. Most recently, I enjoyed co-chairing the technical program committee for the highly successful 10th National Conference on Earthquake Engineering in Anchorage. In 2009, I led the EERI earthquake reconnaissance team to the Sumatra earthquake in Indonesia, where a special effort was made to include students and younger members; proving to be extremely valuable to the team. At Stanford I advise the Stanford EERI Student Chapter and their educational outreach activities with EERI Student Leadership Council. I have also served on the Editorial Board of Earthquake Spectra and other EERI committees.

Throughout its 67-year history, EERI has promoted research and education, facilitated professional and scholarly exchanges, and instigated building code and policy initiatives that have dramatically reduced earthquake risks. But, many challenges remain. We need to move beyond minimum earthquake safety to dramatically reduce the risk of damage and disruption from earthquakes and promote community resilience. At the same time, we must address and not loose sight of the devastating earthquake and tsunami risks that persist for millions of people in economically less advantaged countries. My interest in joining the Board of Directors is to help ensure that EERI will continue to provide leadership to develop and promote effective solutions and strategies for earthquake risk mitigation by fully engaging its multi-disciplinary membership in worthwhile activities.

Looking forward, EERI should be more proactive in establishing a compelling vision for earthquake risk mitigation and resilience – one that can help shape a national agenda on research, professional practice, and governance that will benefit all of humanity. This may involve focused EERI activities at regional, national and international meetings, sponsoring special issue papers in Earthquake Spectra, and engaging the talents of Housner Fellows and other younger members. EERI should also pursue strategic collaborations with scientific and professional organizations, community-based groups, and government agencies and representatives. EERI is fortunate to have an outstanding national and international reputation and a talented and diverse membership. We should continue to strive for ways to put our talents and resources to good use.